Shapiro Wrecked By Rosie O’Donnell When She Tells Him To ‘Suck’ Her ‘D**k’

Shapiro Wrecked by Rosie O’Donnell Rosie1-640x480After She Tells Him To ‘Suck’ Her ‘D**k’

Benny Johnson
Reporter At Large
Ah, political discourse on the internet in an era of Trump.

With the imminent passage of the Republcan tax bill on the horizon Wednesday, resistor Rosie O’Donnell began to melt down. First, Rosie openly offered to bribe two GOP senators to not vote for the tax bill. She offered the senators $2,000,000 for their vote. It was sad.

 

Conservative firebrand Ben Shapiro hopped on Twitter and said that if Trump’s Justice Department would investigate Rosie, he would be “carved into Rushmore by Friday.”

 

In response, Rosie said “suck my dick.”

New Album of Unreleased Jimi Hendrix

New Album of Unreleased Jimi Hendrix Music is Coming in March

By Tosten Burks

Sony Legacy Recordings has announced Both Sides of the Sky, the final installment in the label’s trilogy of archival Jimi Hendrix albums. The posthumous project will feature 13 songs—10 of which have never been heard before—recorded between 1968 and 1970, including a 1969 cover of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock.” It also includes unreleased collaborations with bassist Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles from Hendrix’s funk-rock unit Band of Gypsys. The album comes out on March 9.

Watch Cox and Hendrix’s longtime engineer Eddie Kramer trace Band of Gypsys’ origins below.

 

22 Fun Facts About Scrooged

22 Fun Facts About Scrooged

Paramount Pictures

Paramount Pictures

Since the publication of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol in 1843, the story of Ebenezer Scrooge has become familiar fodder for adaptations of all sorts—from ballets to operas to a mime performance by Marcel Marceau. But Richard Donner’s film adaptation, Scrooged, has one thing that sets it apart: Comedy.

Since its release in 1988, the holiday comedy starring Bill Murray as a ruthless television executive tasked with pulling off a live Christmas Eve broadcast of A Christmas Carol (starring Buddy Hackett, Jamie Farr, the Solid Gold Dancers and Mary-Lou Retton as Tiny Tim!) has become a contemporary classic. Here are 22 things you might not know about the movie.

 

 

1. THE FILM MARKED BILL MURRAY’S RETURN TO THE BIG SCREEN.

Though it’s easy to remember the 1980s as a decade packed with Bill Murray comedies, Scrooged marked a reemergence of sorts of the in-demand comedian. Though he had a brief cameo in Frank Oz’s 1986 remake of Little Shop of Horrors (playing a pain-seeking patient of Orin Scrivello, Steve Martin’s demented dentist character), Scrooged was Murray’s first major role following a self-imposed, four-year exile from Hollywood.

2. MURRAY REFERENCES LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS IN THE MOVIE’S CLOSING SONG.

Scrooged concludes with the cast and crew singing “Put a Little Love in Your Heart.” For his part, Murray went a bit off-script, adding in lines like “Feed me Seymour,” a direct reference to Little Shop of Horrors.

3. MANY MORE OF MURRAY’S LINES WERE AD-LIBBED.

In a 1988 interview with Philadelphia Daily News, Richard Donner discussed Murray’s penchant for improvisation and described the experience of directing Murray as follows: “It’s like standing on 42nd Street and Broadway, and the lights are out, and you’re the traffic cop.”

4. MURRAY HAD ORIGINALLY BEEN APPROACHED ABOUT THE MOVIE TWO YEARS EARLIER.

At that point, he wasn’t ready to jump back into the moviemaking fold just yet. “But when I wanted to work, the scripts were just not good,” Murray told Starlog Magazine in a 1989 interview.

5. BEFORE HE SIGNED ON FOR SCROOGED, MURRAY REQUIRED THAT THE SCRIPT BE REWORKED.

“We tore up the script so badly that we had parts all over the lawn,” Murray told Starlog. “There was a lot I didn’t like. To remake the story, we took the romantic element [Frank’s relationship with his former girlfriend, Claire, played by Karen Allen] and built that up a little more. It existed in the script’s original version, but we had to make more out of it. The family scenes were kind of off, so we worked on that.”

6. THE MOVIE WAS AN SNL REUNION OF SORTS.

The script for Scrooged was written by Mitch Glazer and Michael O’Donoghue, whom Murray had worked with in the early days of Saturday Night Live.

7. EVEN PAUL SHAFFER WAS THERE.

Before he rose to fame as David Letterman’s musical director, Paul Shaffer was a member of the SNL house band from 1975 to 1980 and appeared in a number of sketches, most notably as the piano player to Murray’s Nick the Lounge Singer character. He makes a cameo in Scrooged as a street musician, where he plays alongside fellow musical legends Miles Davis, David Sanborn, and Larry Carlton.

8. A LOT OF FOOTAGE ENDED UP ON THE CUTTING ROOM FLOOR.

“We shot a big, long sloppy movie, so there’s a great deal of material that didn’t even end up in the film,” Murray told Starlog. “It just didn’t work. You tend to forget what was wrong. It’s hard. I just figured that anyone who’s good could step into this part and have a lot of fun with it. It’s sort of a wicked character. The idea of making a funny Scrooge was an inspired touch. That’s what was appealing to me about it.”

9. RICHARD DONNER HAD HIS RESERVATIONS ABOUT TURNING A CHRISTMAS CAROL INTO A COMEDY.

“It’s a thin line,” director Richard Donner told the Texas Archive of the Moving Image about getting the right tone for the film. “But you have two of the most irreverent writers in the world. You have the most irreverent humorist since W.C. Fields. And you say, ‘Let’s go!’ There’s a thin line you walk, but the line is broken—hopefully—in the end of the picture when you see a man evolve out of a situation.”

10. DONNER CALLS IT THE MOVIE WHERE MURRAY BECAME “AN ACTOR.”

Though Scrooged is mainly a comedy, it concludes with Murray’s character being a changed man, who has to deliver a rather dramatic speech in order to make his character’s transformation clear. But Donner told Philadelphia Daily News that what they witnessed in that pivotal scene was something much greater: “On the last take I saw something happen to Billy. I saw Billy Murray become an actor.”

11. DONNER SAVED THAT DRAMATIC SCENE FOR THE VERY END OF THE SHOOT.

“I always had my car parked facing the gate,” Donner joked to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image about how the film’s ultimate success hinged on that final scene. Which is why he saved it for the end. “When Bill Murray played off that last scene in the way that he did, I felt confident—and slightly insecure—but I felt confident that we had accomplished what we wanted,” said Donner.

12. FOR MURRAY, THE BIGGER CHALLENGE WAS CARRYING A MOVIE ON HIS OWN.

Murray was a bona fide movie star by the time Scrooged hit theaters, but up until that point—in movies like Caddyshack, Stripes, and Ghostbusters—he had always been part of an ensemble cast. “Scrooged was harder [than Ghostbusters] because I was by myself, really,” Murray told Starlog. “Even though there are a number of people in the movie, they only had cameos. They would stroll in for a day or two and split. I was there every day, and it was like flunking grade school again and again.”

13. ROBERT MITCHUM’S CAMEO WOULDN’T HAVE HAPPENED WITHOUT MURRAY.

In one of the film’s many aforementioned cameos, Robert Mitchum plays Murray’s boss, Preston Rhinelander. But such a small role for such a major star wasn’t an easy sell, so Donner invited Mitchum to meet with Murray. “Mitchum was not going to play that small a part, but we said, ‘Well come in and meet Bill. Let’s rap, let’s talk,’” Donner recalled to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image. “He came in and we never got a word in edgewise. He’s so wonderful with stories and we didn’t want to talk … The minute you get around Bill, you’re swooning. Everybody is.”

14. SCROOGED IS A MURRAY FAMILY AFFAIR.

Though seeing one of Bill Murray’s brothers in one of his films is nothing new, Scrooged features all three of them—John, Joel, and Brian Doyle-Murray.

15. IT TOOK 23 YEARS FOR THE FILM’S SOUNDTRACK TO BE RELEASED.

It wasn’t until 2011 that Danny Elfman’s score for Scrooged was released. The album, which was limited to just 3000 copies, contained a total of 34 tracks, not all of which were included in the film. The final track is a bonus track that was actually created for Trading Places.

16. KEITH HARING’S WORK MAKES A COUPLE OF CAMEOS.

Look at the background throughout the film and you’ll likely spot Keith Haring’s “Free South Africa” poster on a few occasions. The same poster is seen in Lethal Weapon 2, also directed by Richard Donner, which was released the following year.

17. SAM KINISON WAS SUPPOSED TO PLAY THE GHOST OF CHRISTMAS PAST.

The part eventually went to David Johansen, and rumor has it that that happened because of Murray’s close friendship with the actor-musician. If Johansen’s face looks familiar to you, but not his name, that’s because he often went by a different name at the time: Buster Poindexter. Yes, the very same guy who sang “Hot Hot Hot.”

18. CAROL KANE DIDN’T HAVE MUCH FUN AS THE GHOST OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT.

Though it’s a running gag throughout the film that Carol Kane, as The Ghost of Christmas Present, be rather abusive toward Murray whenever they meet, the task began to take a toll on the actress. Both Donner and Murray told Starlog that Kane would often break down on the set, and spend 20 minutes or so simply crying.

19. KANE’S SCENES WEREN’T MUCH FUN FOR MURRAY EITHER.

In one scene, Kane is supposed to grab Murray’s lip. Which she did—a little too well. “There’s a piece of skin the connects your lip with your gums and it was really pulled away,” Murray explained of the scene to Starlog. “She really hurt me, but it was my idea to be physical and it was her idea just to hit me as opposed to pulling the punches.” Filming had to cease temporarily while Murray healed from the incident.

20. JOHN HOUSEMAN PASSED AWAY LESS THAN A MONTH BEFORE SCROOGED PREMIERED.

John Houseman is yet another one of the preeminent actors who made a brief appearance in Scrooged. Unfortunately, he passed away on October 31, 1988, less than a month before the film made its debut on November 23, 1988.

21. IT WAS THE LAST PERFORMANCE BY THE SOLID GOLD DANCERS.

In the telecast within the movie, one of A Christmas Carol’s selling points is that it will feature the Solid Gold Dancers as The Scroogettes. The movie would mark the small-screen dance group’s final aired performance, as Solid Gold the television series had been cancelled back in July.

22. THE STUDIO PLAYED UP GHOSTBUSTERS’ SUCCESS TO PROMOTE SCROOGED.

In an attempt to recapture the attention of Ghostbusters fans, the studio referenced the movie in Scrooged’s marketing materials, most notably with its tagline: “Bill Murray is back among the ghosts, only this time, it’s three against one.” The tactic probably didn’t get the studio the exact results it was looking for; while Ghostbusters was the second highest-grossing film of 1984 with $229,242,989 in box office totals, Scrooged made about a quarter of that ($60,328,558 to be exact) and was only the 13th highest grossing film of 1988.

Rob Zombie narrates new Charles Manson documentary

Rob Zombie narrates new Charles Manson documentary

by Scott Munro / teamrock.com

 

Rob Zombie has narrated a documentary about murderous cult leader Charles Manson – watch trailer

Rob Zombie has narrated an upcoming documentary about murderous cult leader Charles Manson.

Manson, who was behind a string of brutal killings in California in the late 60s, died earlier this month after spending almost half a century behind bars.

Charles Manson: The Final Words will be broadcast on the Reelz network at 9pm ET on Sunday, December 3 – and producers have released a teaser trailer featuring Zombie’s voice, which can be seen below.

Upon hearing the news of Manson’s death, Marilyn Manson posted a Twitter link to his cover of Manson’s Sick City, which originally appeared on the 1970 album Lie: The Love And Terror Cult.

That move drew the ire of Kiss vocalist and guitarist Paul Stanley, who called it “pathetic” and accused the shock rocker of seeking publicity.

System Of A Down guitarist Daron Malakian also said that Charles Manson’s interviews and music “were a big influence” on him when the band were writing the Toxicity album.

Charles Manson dead at 83

Charles Manson dead at 83

 

Charles Manson was escorted to his arraignment in 1969.

Associated Press/File
Charles Manson was escorted to his arraignment in 1969.

NEW YORK — Charles Manson, one of the most notorious murderers of the 20th century, who was very likely the most culturally persistent and perhaps also the most inscrutable, died on Sunday in Kern County, Calif. He was 83 and had been behind bars for most of his life.

He died of natural causes in a hospital, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said in a news release.

Manson was a semiliterate habitual criminal and failed musician before he came to irrevocable attention in the late 1960s as the wild-eyed leader of the Manson family, a murderous band of young drifters in California. Convicted of nine murders in all, Manson was known in particular for the seven brutal killings collectively called the Tate-LaBianca murders, committed by his followers on two consecutive August nights in 1969.

The most famous of the victims was Sharon Tate, an actress who was married to the film director Roman Polanski. Eight and a half months pregnant, she was killed with four other people at her Benedict Canyon home.

The Tate-LaBianca killings and the seven-month trial that followed were the subjects of fevered news coverage. To a frightened, mesmerized public, the murders, with their undercurrents of sex, drugs, rock ‘n’ roll, and Satanism, seemed the depraved logical extension of the anti-establishment, do-your-own-thing ethos that helped define the ’60s.

Since then, the Manson family has occupied a dark, persistent place in American culture — and American commerce. It has inspired, among other things, pop songs, an opera, films, a host of internet fan sites, T-shirts, children’s wear, and half the stage name of the rock musician Marilyn Manson.

It has also been the subject of many nonfiction books, most famously “Helter Skelter” (1974), by Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry. Bugliosi was the lead prosecutor at the Tate-LaBianca trial.

The Manson family came to renewed attention in 2008, when officials in California, responding to long speculation that there were victims still unaccounted for, searched a stretch of desert in Death Valley. There, in a derelict place known as the Barker Ranch, Manson and his followers had lived for a time in the late ’60s. The search turned up no human remains.

It was a measure of Manson’s hold over his followers, mostly young women who had fled middle-class homes, that he was not physically present at the precise moment that any of the Tate-LaBianca victims was killed. Yet his family swiftly murdered them on his orders, which, according to many later accounts, were meant to incite an apocalyptic race war that Manson called Helter Skelter. He took the name from the title of a Beatles song.

Throughout the decades since, Manson has remained an enigma. Was he a paranoid schizophrenic, as some observers have suggested? Was he a sociopath, devoid of human feeling? Was he a charismatic guru, as his followers once believed and his fans seemingly still do?

Or was he simply flotsam, a man whose life, The New York Times wrote in 1970, “stands as a monument to parental neglect and the failure of the public correctional system”?

No Name Maddox, as Manson was officially first known, was born on Nov. 12, 1934, to a 16-year-old unwed mother in Cincinnati. (Many accounts give the date erroneously as Nov. 11.) His mother, Kathleen Maddox, was often described as having been a prostitute. What is certain, according to Bugliosi’s book and other accounts, is that she was a heavy drinker who lived on the margins of society with a series of men.

Manson apparently never knew his biological father. His mother briefly married another man, William Manson, and gave her young son the name Charles Milles Manson.

Kathleen often disappeared for long periods — when Charles was 5, for instance, she was sent to prison for robbing a gas station — leaving him to bounce among relatives in Ohio, West Virginia, and Kentucky. She was paroled when Charles was 8 and took him back, but kept him for only a few years.

From the age of 12 on, Charles was placed in a string of reform schools. At one institution, he held a razor to a boy’s throat and raped him.

Escaping often, he committed burglaries, auto thefts, and armed robberies, landing in between in juvenile detention centers and eventually federal reformatories. He was paroled from the last one at 19, in May 1954.

Starting in the mid-1950s, Manson, living mostly in Southern California, was variously a busboy, parking-lot attendant, car thief, check forger, and pimp. During this period, he was in and out of prison.

He was married twice: in 1955 to Rosalie Jean Willis, a teenage waitress, and a few years later to a young prostitute named Leona. Both marriages ended in divorce.

Manson was believed to have fathered at least two children over the years: at least one with one of his wives, and at least one more with one of his followers. The precise number, names, and whereabouts of his children — a subject around which rumor and urban legend have long coalesced — could not be confirmed.

By March 1967, when Manson, then 32, was paroled from his latest prison stay, he had spent more than half his life in correctional facilities. On his release, he moved to the Bay Area and eventually settled in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, the nerve center of hippiedom, just in time for the Summer of Love.

There, espousing a philosophy that was an idiosyncratic mix of Scientology, hippie anti-authoritarianism, Beatles lyrics, the Book of Revelation, and the writings of Hitler, he began to draw into his orbit the rootless young adherents who would become known as the Manson family.

Manson had learned to play the guitar in prison and hoped to make it as a singer-songwriter. His voice was once compared to that of the young Frankie Laine, a crooner who first came to prominence in the 1930s.

Manson’s lyrics, by contrast, were often about sex and death, but in the 1960s, that did not stand out very much. (Songs he wrote were later recorded by Guns N’ Roses). Once he was famous, Manson himself released several albums, including “LIE,” issued in 1970, and “Live at San Quentin,” issued in 2006.

With his followers — a loose, shifting band of a dozen or more — Manson left San Francisco for Los Angeles. They stayed awhile in the home of Dennis Wilson, the Beach Boys’ drummer. Manson hoped the association would help him land a recording contract, but none materialized. (The Beach Boys did later record a song, “Never Learn Not to Love,” that was based on one written by Manson, although Wilson, who sang it, gave it new lyrics and a new title — Manson had called it “Cease to Exist” — and took credit for writing it.)

The Manson family next moved to the Spahn Movie Ranch, a mock Old West town north of Los Angeles that was once a film set but had since fallen to ruins. The group later moved to Death Valley, eventually settling at the Barker Ranch.

The desert location would protect the family, Manson apparently thought, in the clash of the races that he believed was inevitable. He openly professed his hatred of black people, and he believed that when Helter Skelter came, blacks would annihilate whites. Then, unable to govern themselves, the blacks would turn for leadership to the Manson family, who would have ridden out the conflict in deep underground holes in the desert.

At some point, Manson seems to have decided to help Helter Skelter along. Late at night on Aug. 8, 1969, he dispatched four family members — Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel, Charles Watson, and Linda Kasabian — to the Tate home in the Hollywood hills. Manson knew the house: Terry Melcher, a well-known record producer with whom he had dealt fruitlessly, had once lived there.

Shortly after midnight on Aug. 9, Atkins, Krenwinkel, and Watson entered the house while Kasabian waited outside. Through a frenzied combination of shooting, stabbing, beating, and hanging, they murdered Tate and four others in the house and on the grounds: Jay Sebring, a Hollywood hairdresser; Abigail Folger, an heiress to the Folger coffee fortune; Voytek (also spelled Wojciech) Frykowski, Folger’s boyfriend; and Steven Parent, an 18-year-old visitor. Tate’s husband, Polanski, was in London at the time.

Before leaving, Atkins scrawled the word “pig” in blood on the front door of the house; in Manson’s peculiar logic, the killings were supposed to look like the work of black militants.

The next night, Aug. 10, Manson and a half-dozen followers drove to a Los Angeles house he appeared to have selected at random. Inside, Manson tied up the residents — a wealthy grocer named Leno LaBianca and his wife, Rosemary — before leaving. After he was gone, several family members stabbed the couple to death. The phrases “Death to Pigs” and “Healter Skelter,” misspelled, were scrawled in blood at the scene.

The seven murders went unsolved for months. Then, in the autumn of 1969, the police closed in on the Manson family after Atkins, in jail on an unrelated murder charge, bragged to cellmates about the killings.

On June 15, 1970, Manson, Atkins, Krenwinkel, and a fourth family member, Leslie Van Houten, went on trial for murder. Kasabian, who had been present on both nights but said she had not participated in the killings, became the prosecution’s star witness and was given immunity. Watson, who had fled to Texas, was tried and convicted separately.

During the trial, the bizarre became routine. On one occasion, Manson lunged at the judge with a pencil. On another, he punched his lawyer in open court. At one point, Manson appeared in court with an “X” carved into his forehead; his co-defendants quickly followed suit. (Manson later carved the X into a swastika, which remained flagrantly visible ever after.)

Outside the courthouse, a small flock of chanting family members kept vigil. One of them, Lynette Fromme, nicknamed Squeaky, would make headlines herself in 1975 when she tried to assassinate President Ford.

On Jan. 25, 1971, after nine days’ deliberation, the jury found Manson, Atkins, and Krenwinkel guilty of seven counts of murder each. Van Houten, who had been present only at the LaBianca murders, was found guilty of two counts. All four were also convicted of conspiracy to commit murder.

On March 29, the jury voted to give all four defendants the death penalty. In 1972, after capital punishment was temporarily outlawed in California, their sentences were reduced to life in prison.

Manson was convicted separately of two other murders: those of Gary Hinman, a musician killed by Manson family members in late July 1969, and Donald Shea, a Barker Ranch stuntman killed late that August. Altogether, Manson and seven family members were eventually convicted of one to nine murders apiece.

Incarcerated in a series of prisons over the years, Manson passed the time by playing the guitar, doing menial chores, and making scorpions and spiders out of thread from his socks. His notoriety made him a target: In 1984, he was treated for second- and third-degree burns after being doused with paint thinner by a fellow inmate and set ablaze.

Manson was turned down for parole a dozen times, most recently in 2012. Most of the other convicted family members remain in prison. Atkins died in prison in 2009, at 61, of natural causes.

The Manson family was an inspiration for the television series “Aquarius,” broadcast on NBC in 2015 and 2016. A period drama set in the late ’60s, it starred David Duchovny as a Los Angeles police detective who comes up against Manson (played by the British actor Gethin Anthony) in the course of investigating a teenage girl’s disappearance.

To the end of his life, Manson denied having ordered the Tate-LaBianca murders. Nor, as he replied to a question he was often asked, did he feel remorse, in any case.

He said as much in 1986 in a prison interview with the television journalist Charlie Rose.

“So you didn’t care?” Rose asked, invoking Tate and her unborn child.

“Care?” Manson replied.

He added, “What the hell does that mean, ‘care’?”

 

bostonglobe.com

Experts debunk 4 winter driving myths

Experts debunk 4 winter driving myths

 

Traveling in the snow and ice is dangerous, especially in a car.

Drivers are often misinformed about the safest ways to operate and take care of a car in winter conditions.

Myth #1: You should always let a vehicle idle before driving it in cold weather

While it may be convenient to hop into an already warm vehicle, idling a car before driving it in cold conditions can be bad for your health, wallet and car.

The carbon monoxide an engine emits while running a car is dangerous and fuel is consumed faster.

Some argue that these sacrifices are worth it in order to protect their vehicles.

However, Dustin Stec, a Bridgestone AutoCare manager, argues that there is no benefit at all to letting your car run for a while before driving it.

snow car maryland storm

Mike Roach, right, of New York, a junior at Towson University, clears snow from his car after getting stuck in Towson, Md., Monday, Jan. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
The common misconception stems from the fact that there was a time when “heating up” a car was necessary.

“Years ago when cars weren’t computer controlled or fuel injected, you had to rely on mechanic delivery of fuel,” Stec said.

“In the wintertime when it was exceptionally cold, that component of the carburetor didn’t work well, and it had to warm up before it worked efficiently.”

Stec said that today’s technology allows a car’s computer to compensate for the temperature difference in order to make it work immediately and efficiently.

Myth #2: Four-wheel drive makes a car safe to drive in the snow

Though four-wheel drive is a serious advantage in reaching a destination in the snow, it cannot assist in stopping a car.

“Stopping relies on driving correctly and having winter tires on your car in snow and ice,” Stec said.

He argued that driver education and safety trump reliance on a vehicle’s capabilities. Four-wheel drive is an asset, not a safety net.

Chris Welty, a Bridgestone tire specialist, also claimed that winter tires are a necessity and that they allow a driver to stop 30 percent faster in snow and ice.

snow tires driving car winter

(Flickr photo/lungstruck)
“They are the most important part of the car in inclement weather,” Welty said. “When it is cold enough that you can see your breath outside, it is time to change your tires.”

He said that people often confuse winter tires with all-season tires, but that tires should change with the seasons.

He also finds that many people think letting air out of a vehicle’s tires will create better traction.

“Tires are designed and intended to operate at a certain pressure rating, and decreasing or changing that pressure rating in an attempt to get better performance decreases the performance of the tire,” Welty said.

Myth #3: Your parking brake can help you stop in winter weather

Experts argue that it may be best to stay away from the parking brake.

“By pulling the parking brake on a car in a panic situation, you would negate the ability of the car to enable its anti-lock braking system, therefore decreasing the stopping ability or the capacity of the car,” Stec said.

The parking brake also has the potential to freeze when trying to release it in extreme cold.

Tires will perform at 100 percent when braking, but steering will reduce the brake’s capabilities, Welty said.

“Steer away from an obstacle if you cannot brake,” Welty said.

Myth #4: It’s safe to pass other drivers who may be moving slower than you

winter driving snow plow snow road

A snow plow works on a road in Oregon. (Photo/Oregon Department of Transportation)
Though it’s tempting to pass a slow-moving car when you’re in a rush, it might be dangerous amid wintry conditions.

“If you encounter a snowplow, it means that what is in front of it may be difficult,” Welty said. This could signal that it’s best to hang back.

If you do decide to pass another driver, be sure to use caution.

“When you want to pass someone and your wheels go from dry or wet asphalt to ice or snow, the car can abruptly become out of control when you hit the gas pedal.”

By Randi Ivler, AccuWeather staff writer

Pretenders’ Chrissie Hynde Curses Out Camera-Happy Fans, Walks Offstage In Dubai

Pretenders’ Chrissie Hynde Curses Out Camera-Happy Fans, Walks Offstage In Dubai

Tom Breihan, Stereogum

When new wave legends the Pretenders play live, they post signs asking people in the audience not to use cell phones while they’re onstage. Of course, people don’t comply too often, and last week in Dubai, frontwoman Chrissie Hynde reportedly unloaded on the audience, cursing them out before storming offstage early.

According to The Sun, Hynde was only a song into the Pretenders’ Thursday night set at Dubai’s Irish Village venue when she called people in the audience “cunts” for recording her. She also told them that she didn’t give a fuck because she already had their money. She also reportedly flipped off phone users and, as she was leaving the stage, “cocked her leg” and told the crowd to “take a picture of that.”

The National reports that, according to people who were in the crowd on Thursday night, Hynde also told people in the crowd to stick their phones up their ass and informed them that the Pretenders “ain’t Lady Gaga or Katy Perry, so if you wanna use your fucking phones, go and see them.”

In a post on Facebook earlier this month, Hynde apologized for cussing out fans with phones on a recent UK tour: “I do want to apologise for being a bit of a bitch when it came to camera phones and just being myself in general. As you probably know by now, when i’m not on the stage, i like to retain a very ordinary profile and get embarrassed by uninvited attentions. So if I told anyone to ‘get lost’ – it’s just me being the citizen God intended me to be.”

This post originally appeared on Stereogum

 

Marilyn Manson Guitarist Twiggy Ramirez Accused of Rape

Marilyn Manson Guitarist Twiggy Ramirez Accused of Rape

By Dave Lifton diffuser.fm

Doe no — Arby’s is selling a venison sandwich

Doe no — Arby’s is selling a venison sandwich

Arby's is selling a venison sandwich in heavy deer-hunting states.

Oh deer — Arby’s is making a venison sandwich.

The fast food chain known for hot roast beef and brisket is embracing its “We Have the Meats” slogan by adding wild game to the menu this hunting season.

Arby’s is rolling out a thick-cut venison steak starting Monday sourced from “free-range farmed deer that feed on fresh grass from New Zealand,” according to an Arby’s spokesperson. The steak is marinated in garlic, salt and pepper, and cooked for three hours. It will be topped with crispy onions and juniper berry sauce.

The $5 speciality sandwich will be available in 17 stores at select “heavy deer hunting areas” in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia through Nov. 27, according to the press release.

8 classics going extinct, because millennials

“Hunters hunt the meats, and we have the meats, so it makes sense for us to connect with them and offer a sandwich that they can’t get at any other restaurant chain,” said Arby’s chief marketing officer Rob Lynch in a statement.

Venison is notoriously tough to cook without getting gamey, however, and even Lynch admits the new sandwich is “probably the biggest stretch for us yet.”

A rep told The News that if enough diners fawn over it, however, Arby’s could consider selling the venison sammie nationally.

 

nydailynews.com

LAPD Admits Error In Announcing Death Of Tom Petty — Who’s Still Off Life Support

LAPD Admits Error In Announcing Death Of Tom Petty — Who’s Still Off Life Support

October 2, 2017 at 1:33 PM (PT)

TomPetty2017.jpg

Tom Petty (Shutterstock)

Despite an avalanche of media reports reporting on the death of TOM PETTY, one of the original sources for the information, the The LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT, has backtracked in a series of tweets. “The LAPD has no information about the passing of singer TOM PETTY. Initial information was inadvertently provided to some media sources,” the first one stated, followed by, “However, the LAPD has no investigative role in this matter. We apologize for any inconvenience in this reporting.”

TMZ now reports that “a chaplain was called to TOM’s hospital room on MONDAY morning, and that “the family has a do not resuscitate order on TOM. The singer is not expected to live throughout the day, but he’s still clinging to life.”

Furthermore, besides backtracking on its initial claims, the LAPD noted that the L.A. COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPT. handled the emergency.

PETTY was rushed to the hospital SUNDAY night (10/1) after being found unconscious in his MALIBU home. There they found he had no brain activity. Earlier today (10/2), a decision was made to pull life support.

 

allaccess.com